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Australia plans to stop migrants settling in top cities

Posted by On 9:38 PM

Australia plans to stop migrants settling in top cities

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Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks during a bilateral meeting at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, on Sept 13, 2018.
Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks during a bilateral meeting at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, on Sept 13, 2018.
Published7 hours ago

Australia is planning to rein in the rush of migrants to cities such as Sydney and Melbourne, which have been struggling with congestion and housing problems, by reportedly forcing them to live in less popular cities.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison reportedly plans to require some migrants to live outside Sydney or Melbourne for up to five years. The government efforts to spread out the migrants could potentially extend to international students.

The new Population Minist er, Mr Alan Tudge, said the problem is not the growing population, which hit 25 million recently, but how the growth is distributed.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 15, 2018, with the headline 'Australia plans to stop migrants settling in top cities'. Print Edition | Subscribe Topics:
  • AUSTRALIA
  • MIGRANTS/MIGRATION (LEGAL)

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